/Film Study: Little room for Leonard to move in Game 2

Film Study: Little room for Leonard to move in Game 2

On the other hand, playing late into the clock puts pressure on a team’s offense. For every team in the league, effective field goal percentage is lowest in those last six seconds of the clock.

In most instances, the Raptors would probably like to get something earlier in the clock. But getting a good shot early in a possession has proven to be difficult.

 

Should Toronto have fouled late in Game 2 to prevent Andre Iguodala’s 3-pointer?

The Raptors have been moving the ball. Their 330 passes in Game 2 were the most they’ve had in a game since the first round (if you don’t count the 349 they had in their double-overtime win in Game 3 of the conference finals).

But all those passes mean that Kawhi Leonard, the Raptors’ best player and most efficient scorer, isn’t getting his in-rhythm shots off the dribble, via pick-and-rolls or isolations. Leonard has been forced to give up the ball more than the Raptors would probably like.

 

All eyes on Kawhi

The Warriors have obviously been defending Leonard aggressively. The second defender on pick-and-rolls has generally stayed with Leonard until he has given up the ball. They’ve doubled him in the post and even sent a second defender at him before he can get into an isolation situation. When Leonard has managed to get into the paint, he’s been met by a crowd of defenders.

                            Leonard draws Warriors' attention

All that attention has resulted in a lot of trips to the line. He’s drawn 22 fouls (nine more than any other player in the series) and, with 28 free throw attempts in two games, Leonard’s free throw rate (FTA/FGA) in The Finals (0.824) is more than double his rate through the first three rounds (0.397).

The attention should also result in some open shots just one or two passes away. But Leonard’s teammates have attempted only 25 shots off his passes. That accounts for just 23 percent of the 108 shots his teammates have taken while he’s been on the floor, a rate almost in line with his rate from the regular season (22 percent). For context, Giannis Antetokounmpo and LeBron James had rates of *42 percent and 51 percent in the regular season, respectively.

* In case that last part was a little confusing, here’s the math: Antetokounmpo’s teammates took 3,184 shots while he was on the floor. Of those 3,184, 1,133 (42 percent) were off his passes.

Leonard is one of the most complete players in the league, but playmaking is his shortcoming. When he had nine assists in Game 5 of the conference finals, it was a career high … for both the regular season and playoffs (now 574 total games).

A look at the film from Game 2 of this series can show us why a guy who has the ball as much as he does and who draws so much attention from opposing defenses is averaging less than four assists per game. It also shows us how the Raptors continue to get stuck in late-clock situations.